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15 Most Beautiful Places In India You Must Visit Before You Die

If you haven’t visited these 15 most beautiful places in India, then it’s time to pack your bag.

1. Taj Mahal

The Taj Mahal incorporates and expands on design traditions of Persian architecture and earlier Mughal architecture. Specific inspiration came from successful Timurid and Mughal buildings including; the Gur-e Amir (the tomb of Timur, progenitor of the Mughal dynasty, in Samarkand)

2. Auroville

Auroville is an experimental township in Viluppuram district in the state of Tamil Nadu, India, near Puducherry in South India. It was founded in 1968 by Mirra Alfassa and designed by architect Roger Anger.

3. Athirappilly Falls

Athirappilly Falls is situated in Athirappilly panchayath in Thrissur district of Kerala, on the southwest coast of India. Located on the west-flowing Chalakudy River near the Vazhachal Forest Division and the Sholayar ranges, this 24-metre (80 ft) waterfall and the nearby Vazhachal Falls are popular tourist destinations. It is nicknamed “The Niagara of India”. Controversy about a state-proposed hydroelectric dam on the Chalakudy River above the waterfalls began in the 1990s and has continued through 2011.

4. Kashmir Valley

Kashmir is the very beautiful place among all other places in India. It is situated in between the Great Himalaya and Pir Panjal mountain range. It is the northern Indian State, which is entitled as ‘ Paradise on Earth’ . It is just like the crown destination of India. Nature has sanctified Kashmir with infinite beauty and so it is the wonderful place for Holidays, Honeymoon, and winter sports.

5. Lotus Temple

Like all other Bahá’í Houses of Worship, the Lotus Temple is open to all, regardless of religion, or any other distinction, as emphasized in Bahá’í texts. The Bahá’í laws emphasize that the spirit of the House of Worship be that it is a gathering place where people of all religions may worship God without denominational restrictions

 6. Agatti Aerodrome

Agatti Airport, located in India, has been considered as having one of the prettiest runways in the world. The runway stretches right out into the Indian Ocean which has come under scrutiny because of rising sea levels and the relatively short runway (4000 feet). Nevertheless, this is still one of the strangest airports in the world.

7. Yumthang Valley

Yumthang Valley is a grazing pasture surrounded by the Himalayan mountains in the North Sikkim district of Sikkim, India. It is at an elevation of 3,564 metres above msl at a distance of 150 km from the state capital Gangtok.

8. Lake Pangong Tso, Ladakh, India

Pangong Tso, Tibetan for “long, narrow, enchanted lake”, also referred to as Pangong Lake, is an endorheic lake in the Himalayas situated at a height of about 4,350 m (14,270 ft). It is 134 km (83 mi) long and extends from India to Tibet.

9. Cherrapunji Falls ( Nohkalikai Falls)

A notable feature of monsoon rain at Cherrapunji is that most of it falls in the morning. This could be partly due to two air masses coming together. During the monsoon months, the prevailing winds along the Brahmaputra valley generally blow from the east or the northeast, but the winds over Meghalaya are from the south. These two winds systems usually come together in the vicinity of the Khasi Hills. Apparently the winds that are trapped in the valley at night begin their upward ascent only after they are warmed during the day. This partially explains the frequency of morning rainfall. Apart from orographic features, atmospheric convection plays an important role during the monsoon and the period just preceding it. Name of the Falls is linked to a legend about a local woman, Likai, who after a family tragedy became insane and jumped off the cliff next to the falls.

10. Nanda Devi Hills

Nanda Devi is the second highest mountain in India and the highest entirely within the country; owing to this geography it was considered the highest known mountain in the world until computations on Dhaulagiri by western surveyors in 1808.

11. Hogenakkal Falls

Hogenakkal Falls or Hogenakal Falls is a waterfall in South India on the river Kaveri. It is located in the Dharmapuri district of the southern Indian state of Tamil Nadu, about 180 km (110 mi) from Bangalore and 46 km (29 mi) from Dharmapuri town. It is sometimes referred to as the “Niagara of India”. With its fame for medicinal baths and hide boat rides, it is a major site of tourist attraction. Carbonatite rocks in this site are considered to be the oldest of its kind in South Asia and one of the oldest in the world. This is also the site of a proposed project to generate drinking water.

12. Chandra Taal, Himachal Pradesh

Chandra Taal, or Chandra Tal or Chander Taal, is situated at an altitude of about 4,300 metres in the Himalayas. Mountains of scree overlook the lake on one side, and a magnificent cirque presents a view on the other.

13. Mysore Palace

The Palace of Mysore (also known as the Amba Vilas Palace) is a historical palace in the city of Mysore in Karnataka, southern India. It is the official residence and seat of the Wodeyars — the Maharajas of Mysore, the former royal family of Mysore, who ruled the princely state of Mysore from 1399 to 1950. The palace houses two durbar halls (ceremonial meeting halls of the royal court) and incorporates a mesmerizing and gigantic array of courtyards, gardens, and buildings. The palace is in the central region of inner Mysore, facing the Chamundi Hills eastward.

14. Andamans

The Andaman and Nicobar Islands were shrouded in mystery for centuries because of their inaccessibility. These are the paragon of beauty and present a landscape full with scenic and picturesque extravaganza. These islands shimmer like emeralds in the Bay of Bengal. The dense forest which cover these islands and the innumerable exotic flowers and birds create a highly poetic and romantic atmosphere.

15. Kerela Backwaters

The Kerala backwaters are a chain of brackish lagoons and lakes lying parallel to the Arabian Sea coast (known as the Malabar Coast) of Kerala state in southern India. The network includes five large lakes linked by canals, both manmade and natural, fed by 38 rivers, and extending virtually half the length of Kerala state. The backwaters were formed by the action of waves and shore currents creating low barrier islands across the mouths of the many rivers flowing down from the Western Ghats range.

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